Book reviews and recommendations, Cli-Fi Series, Kildare Climate Fiction Series

Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi) Friday: Recommended Reads

Welcome to week 3 of Cli- Fi Friday Cli-Fi, we hope you enjoyed last weeks recommendations. This week we thought you might enjoy some Non-Fiction options.

Looking to dive in? Over the next 12 weeks every Friday we will post some new recommendations for you to sink your teeth into. Here are few suggestions to get you started.

Title : Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants

Author : Robin Wall Kimmerer

Synopsis: Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings – asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass – offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth and learn to give our own gifts in return.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here or get it now on your BorrowBox.

Title : This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate

Author : Naomi Klein

Synopsis: Despite mounting scientific evidence, denialism is surging in many wealthy countries, and extreme fossil-fuel extraction gathers pace. Exposing the work of ideologues on the right who know the challenge this poses to the free market all too well, Naomi Klein also challenges the failing strategies of environmental groups.

This Changes Everything argues that the deep changes required should not be viewed as punishments to fear, but as a kind of gift. It’s time to stop running from the full implications of the crisis and begin to embrace them. Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of the international bestsellers, The Shock Doctrine and No Logo. She is a member of the board of directors for 350.org, a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, and a former Miliband Fellow at the LSE. She holds an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws from the University of King’s College, Nova Scotia.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here or get it now on your BorrowBox.

Title : Small is Beautiful: A Study of Economics as if People Mattered

Author : Ernst F Schumacher

Synopsis: Small is Beautiful is E. F. Schumacher’s stimulating and controversial study of economics and its purpose. This remarkable book examines our modern economic system – its use of resources and impact on how we live – questioning whether they reflect what we truly care about. The revolutionary ideas are as pertinent, inspirational and thought-provoking today as when they were first published in 1973.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here or get it now on your BorrowBox.

Title : The End of Nature

Author : Bill McKibben

Synopsis:

McKibben’s argument that the survival of the globe is dependent on a fundamental, philosophical shift in the way we relate to nature is more relevant than ever. McKibben writes of our Earth’s environmental cataclysm, addressing such core issues as the greenhouse effect, acid rain, and the depletion of the ozone layer. His new introduction addresses some of the latest environmental issues that have risen during the 1990s.

More than simply a handbook for survival or a doomsday catalog of scientific prediction, this classic, soulful lament on nature is required reading for nature enthusiasts, activists, and concerned citizens alike.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here .

Title : All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis

Author : Edited by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

Synopsis: There is a renaissance blooming in the climate movement: leadership that is more characteristically feminine and more faithfully feminist, rooted in compassion, connection, creativity, and collaboration. While it’s clear that women and girls are vital voices and agents of change for this planet, they are too often missing from the proverbial table. More than a problem of bias, it’s a dynamic that sets us up for failure. To change everything, we need everyone.  

All We Can Save illuminates the expertise and insights of dozens of diverse women leading on climate in the United States—scientists, journalists, farmers, lawyers, teachers, activists, innovators, wonks, and designers, across generations, geographies, and race—and aims to advance a more representative, nuanced, and solution-oriented public conversation on the climate crisis. These women offer a spectrum of ideas and insights for how we can rapidly, radically reshape society.   Intermixing essays with poetry and art, this book is both a balm and a guide for knowing and holding what has been done to the world, while bolstering our resolve never to give up on one another or our collective future. We must summon truth, courage, and solutions to turn away from the brink and toward life-giving possibility. Curated by two climate leaders, the book is a collection and celebration of visionaries who are leading us on a path toward all we can save.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here or get it now on your BorrowBox.

Title : The Uninhabitable Earth: A Story of the Future

Author : David Wallace-Wells

Synopsis: It is worse, much worse, than you think. The slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn’t happening at all, and if your anxiety about it is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today. Over the past decades, the term “Anthropocene” has climbed into the popular imagination – a name given to the geologic era we live in now, one defined by human intervention in the life of the planet. But however sanguine you might be about the proposition that we have ravaged the natural world, which we surely have, it is another thing entirely to consider the possibility that we have only provoked it, engineering first in ignorance and then in denial a climate system that will now go to war with us for many centuries, perhaps until it destroys us. In the meantime, it will remake us, transforming every aspect of the way we live-the planet no longer nurturing a dream of abundance, but a living nightmare.

If you’d like to read this book you can place a hold on a copy for pickup in any of our libraries by requesting it here or get it now on your BorrowBox.

Join us next week for another list of recommended Cli-Fi reads.

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